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Tag: Outer Space

Time-lapse from the ISS

Have you ever wondered what I, as reigning Space Pope, sees every day as I sail over your puny, insignificant world deciding whether today shall be the day I raze your filthy planet with fire? It looks a lot like this. Of course, I see many more worlds filled with many more people more deserving of life than you pitiful humans.

Rockets, the French space synth pop you always wanted

I know you woke up this morning thinking, “Fuck. I need some super sweet French space synth music in my life in a serious as hell way. Right now. I can’t fucking wait!”

GUESS WHAT!?

It’s your lucky day. Courtesy of Aesop Dekker at Cosmic Hearse, I bring you six albums of some of the most perfect cheese ever committed to tape. It might be perfect. And if you don’t enjoy it, I feel for your soul since it will spend eternity in hell*.

Get the albums here: Rockets Beaucoup

When you’ve listened to them all and feel like you wanted to explore the outer regions of space with yours truly, The Space Pope, come on back and tell me why I should take you with me and how disappointed you’re going to be when I don’t.

*The Black Laser does not actually condone belief in Hell or, by extension, Heaven.

Cosmos

An all girl Japanese synth trio? SIGN ME UP.

A voice from outer space.

This video shows a high speed train concept developed by some Chinese engineers which is all fine and good, but, really, who cares? The real point of this video is the amazing outer space voice of the female announcer. What the hell is this shit about? I’ve heard Chinese spoken plenty of times in my life, but this is wild. And the reverb? Why?! WHY?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?

KHAAANNNN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Apollo 11 Saturn V Launch (HD) Camera E-8

Wow. This is amazing. Though I’ve posted it here, I think you should go to the actual vimeo page, http://vimeo.com/4366695, and watch it in full screen high definition.

Here’s what the narrator says about the film.

This clip is raw from Camera E-8 on the launch umbilical tower/mobile launch program of Apollo 11, July 16, 1969. This is an HD transfer from the 16mm original.

The camera is running at 500 fps, making the total clip of over 8 minutes represent just 30 seconds of actual time. Narration is provided by Mark Gray (me), Executive Producer for Spacecraft Films.

Watch it now.

Do you know what this is?

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It’s a photo taken by Thierry Legault of a space shuttle in front of the sun. Seriously? How rad is that? Too rad, is the answer. Too rad. The Space Pope is pleased.

If you want to see more photos and read his explanation, check out the site here.

Using CD players to stabilize things in SPACE!

Dude, science is so awesome. Thanks, NASA, for filling my Tuesday morning at work with awesome.

Can you see The Space Pope’s Palace?

Hahaha, just kidding! Any fool knows the Space Pope lives far beyond this pathetic solar system.

Nevertheless, Cassini’s photos of Saturn are incredible. These are from a recent set that NASA received from the satellite as it cruised around Saturn’s outer rings. It’s like a hippy-dippy trip through the mysteries of space and cosmic unknowns. I will never see this with my own eyes, though, hopefully, one day some people will. It really makes me wonder what the hell else is out there in the unfathomably massive universe in which we are but a tiny speck. Further, the scale on these photos is a little mind-boggling. Often they note that the scale is something like 8km per PIXEL. What? Whatever. I’m not even going to try and think about that.

Here are some of my favorites.

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Rhea passes in front of Saturn’s larger, hazy moon Titan (which is lit from behind by the sun) in June of 2006. (NASA/JPL/SSI)

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Cassini looks toward Rhea’s cratered, icy landscape with the dark line of Saturn’s ringplane and the planet’s murky atmosphere as a background. Rhea is Saturn’s second-largest moon, at 1,528 km (949 mi) across. Images taken using red, green and blue spectral filters were combined to create this natural color view. The images were acquired on July 17, 2007 at a distance of approximately 1.2 million km (770,000 mi) from Rhea. Image scale is 7 km (5 mi) per pixel. (NASA/JPL/SSI)

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Small, battered Epimetheus before Saturn’s A and F rings, and and smog-enshrouded Titan (5,150 km/3,200 mi wide) beyond. The color information in the colorized view is artificial: it is derived from red, green and blue images taken at nearly the same time and phase angle as the clear filter image. This color information was overlaid onto a previously released clear filter view in order to approximate the scene as it might appear to human eyes. The view was acquired on April 28, 2006, at a distance of approximately 667,000 km (415,000 mi) from Epimetheus and 1.8 million km (1.1 million mi) from Titan. The image scale is 4 km (2 mi) per pixel on Epimetheus and 11 km (7 mi) per pixel on Titan. (NASA/JPL/SSI)

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Cassini peers through the fine, smoke-sized ice particles of Saturn’s F ring toward the cratered face of Mimas (396 km/246 mi wide). The F ring’s core is dense enough to completely block the light from Mimas. The image was taken on Nov. 18, 2007 at a distance of approximately 772,000 km (480,000 mi) from Mimas. Image scale is 5 km (3 mi) per pixel on the moon. (NASA/JPL/SSI)

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Cassini peers through Saturn’s delicate, translucent inner C ring to see the diffuse yellow-blue limb of Saturn’s atmosphere. The image was taken on April 25, 2008 at a distance of approximately 1.5 million km (913,000 mi) from Saturn. Image scale is 8 km (5 mi) per pixel. (NASA/JPL/SSI)

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Saturn’s high north is a seething cauldron of activity filled with roiling cloud bands and swirling vortices. A corner of the north polar hexagon is seen at upper left. The image was taken on Aug. 25, 2008 at a distance of approximately 541,000 km (336,000 mi) from Saturn. Image scale is 29 km (18 mi) per pixel. (NASA/JPL/SSI)

Shit, I could post all 24 of these. So just go to the site I stole them from: The Big Picture on Boston.com.